Changing…Evolving…Acclimating

“If you can’t acclimate, you disintegrate.” – Katie Kacvinsky I learned the art of acclimation working for a state government agency for many years. I often called our agency the Department of Change because we never sat still. Policy and procedures were constantly evolving and employees were expected to acclimate. We had no other choice. Monday, May 10th, was a day of change, a day I became fully vaccinated and celebrated with a walk-and-talk with one of my pastors as he willRead more

#SoCS: The Days, Weeks, Month, Year of Unbelievable.

I distinctly remember the day that I packed up a laptop, numerous files, office supplies, and anything else I could think of in a rush of adrenaline. It was March 24, 2020, and I had been told I would be working from home until further notice. The offices were closing to the public and minimal staffing across our department had to be scheduled and organized. Covid-19 was on the move across America. For at least three weeks prior, we hadRead more

Thinking…

“It isn’t what you have or who you are or where you are or what you are doing that makes you happy or unhappy. It is what you think about it.” ― Dale Carnegie I think a lot when I’m on the bike. Reflective, as in a shadow’s outline. In 2020, that process was not always beneficial. Politics, pandemic and my own gloomy thoughts and self-righteous opinions stuck deep in parts of the brain while the limbs and heart were tryingRead more

#WATWB: Health Equity in the U.S.

For this month’s We are the World Blogfest, I’ve chosen to spotlight the Director of the White House’s Covid-19 Health Equity Task Force. Dr. Marcella Nunez-Smith, who is an associate professor of medicine and epidemiology at the Yale School of Medicine, has a huge task in front of her as she addresses disparities related to the pandemic and how people are treated for the illness. You can read about Dr. Nunez-Smith and what she hopes to accomplish HERE and HERE.Read more

A Slap of the White Glove

“Challenge yourself to be an example of change.”― Debasish Mridha Staying active in Wisconsin in the winter, during a pandemic, can be like staying sober after two or three beers. It’s difficult, especially when the fierce NE winds and single digit (F) temps make me shiver at the thought. Winter often has the effect of invoking hibernation – the desire to sleep and be lazy, along with watching TV from the butt indentation of the couch, writing sparsely and the lackRead more

#SoCS: I Need a Cape

First thing, right off the bat, I need sun. More sun. In the past three weeks, it’s been mighty scarce. I think we had one day where it came out for about 20 minutes and another day this week when it would filter itself behind a cloud, shine bright for a few minutes, then go back under the clouds. This may be the reason why I feel a bit lethargic of late. If it were not for the pandemic, NatashaRead more

Acknowledging Abundance

“Acknowledging the good that you already have in your life is the foundation for all abundance.”― Eckhart Tolle I blogged about this before, but in case you missed it, I have been keeping a gratitude journal since May of 2019. I acknowledge three things to be grateful for every day, no matter how big or small or weird (rainbow and unicorn hope is a thing). Repetition is okay, especially if it’s near and dear to the heart, like summertime, bacon andRead more

SoCS: Too Much Sh*t

I am not as sharp as I used to be. I never professed to have a steel-trap memory or the ability to retain every piece of knowledge that ever entered through two blue eyes or waxy ear canals. Although, I seem to remember a higher brain-functioning me prior to the age of 50. Could have been a dream. Could be I have a flexible memory. Nevertheless… For the last several years, I have blamed my lack of sharpness on theRead more

#WATWB: Smiling Through a Mask

From NBC – The Today Show: “When Asli Knowles saw Dr. Brian Travers’ clear masks on Instagram she had to have one. Knowles works at a grocery store and wanted people to see her face. And, she wanted to communicate with deaf and hard of hearing customers without risking their health. When she requested a mask, Travers’ felt so moved that he wrote a letter to her managers.” Dr. Travers lost his hearing in 2002 due to brittle bone diseaseRead more

Indivisible, One Nation

The Pledge of Allegiance was written in August 1892 by the socialist minister Francis Bellamy (1855-1931). It was originally published in The Youth’s Companion on September 8, 1892. Bellamy had hoped that the pledge would be used by citizens in any country. In its original form it read: “I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.” On Friday, July 3rd, there were fireworks at Mount Rushmore inRead more

A Bad Remake

“It’s the same thing every day, Clean up your room, stand up straight, pick up your feet, take it like a man, be nice to your sister, don’t mix beer and wine ever…oh yeah, don’t drive on the railroad tracks.” ~Phil Connors~ Groundhog Day It’s Day 72 of working from home during a pandemic. I’m fine except some days I feel like Phil, on repeat, only as a woman with a brother. While no two days have been exactly alike,Read more

#WATWB: A Sweet Birthday Treat

Often, during the past couple months of staying safe at home, roommate Natasha would yell out the patio window,“Hey FedEx (or UPS) person, thank you for working the front lines! Thank you for your service!”  We have been doing a lot of online shopping in order to avoid the stores whenever possible. Much like the grocery story or the postal delivery workers, the package delivery people have played a very important part during the COVID-19 pandemic, making our lives saferRead more